SATIRE

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sat·ire http://img.tfd.com/m/sound.swf (str)

n.

1.

a. A literary work in which human vice or folly is attacked through irony, derision, or wit.
b. The branch of literature constituting such works. See Synonyms at caricature.
2. Irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit used to attack or expose folly, vice, or stupidity.

[Latin satira, probably alteration (influenced by Greek satur, satyr, and saturos, burlesque of a mythical episode) of (lanx) satura, fruit (plate) mixture, from feminine of satur, sated, well-fitted; see s- in Indo-European roots.]

The
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published
by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


satire

Noun
1. the use of ridicule to expose incompetence, evil, or corruption
2. a play, novel, or poem containing satire [Latin satira a mixture]
satirical adj

Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006

ThesaurusLegend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Noun 1. satiresatire
– witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to
upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort
of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but
their own"–Jonathan Swift

humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour – a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2008 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

satire

noun 2. parody, mockery, caricature, send-up Brit. (informal) spoof (informal) travesty, takeoff (informal) lampoon, skit, burlesque

Collins Essential Thesaurus 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2005, 2006

iRONY

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i·ro·ny http://img.tfd.com/m/sound.swf (r-n, r-)

n. pl. i·ro·nies

1.

a. The use of words to express something different from and often opposite to their literal meaning.
b. An expression or utterance marked by a deliberate contrast between apparent and intended meaning.
c. A literary style employing such contrasts for humorous or rhetorical effect. See Synonyms at wit1.
2.

a. Incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs: "Hyde noted the irony of Ireland’s copying the nation she most hated"(Richard Kain).
b. An occurrence, result, or circumstance notable for such incongruity. See Usage Note at ironic.
3. Dramatic irony.
4. Socratic irony.

[French ironie, from Old French, from Latin rna, from Greek eirneia, feigned ignorance, from eirn, dissembler, probably from eirein, to say; see wer-5 in Indo-European roots.]

The
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published
by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


irony

Noun
pl -nies
1. the mildly sarcastic use of words to imply the opposite of what they normally mean
2. a situation or result that is the direct opposite of what was expected or intended [Greek eirōneia]

Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006

ThesaurusLegend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Noun 1. ironyirony
– witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to
upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort
of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but
their own"–Jonathan Swift

humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour – a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

2. irony
– incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs;
"the irony of Ireland’s copying the nation she most hated"

incongruity, incongruousness – the quality of disagreeing; being unsuitable and inappropriate
Socratic irony – admission of your own ignorance and willingness to learn while exposing someone’s inconsistencies by close questioning

3. irony – a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs

antiphrasis – the use of a word in a sense opposite to its normal sense (especially in irony)
dramatic irony
– (theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is
understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
figure of speech, trope, image, figure – language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
indeed – (used as an interjection) an expression of surprise or skepticism or irony etc.; "Wants to marry the butler? Indeed!"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2008 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

LITERALLY

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lit·er·al·ly http://img.tfd.com/m/sound.swf (ltr--l)

adv.

1. In a literal manner; word for word: translated the Greek passage literally.
2. In a literal or strict sense: Don’t take my remarks literally.
3. Usage Problem

a. Really; actually: "There are people in the world who literally do not know how to boil water" (Craig Claiborne).
b. Used as an intensive before a figurative expression.
Usage Note: For more than a hundred years, critics have remarked on the incoherency of using literally
in a way that suggests the exact opposite of its primary sense of "in a
manner that accords with the literal sense of the words." In 1926, for
example, H.W. Fowler cited the example "The 300,000 Unionists … will be literally thrown to the wolves." The practice does not stem from a change in the meaning of literallyif it did, the word would long since have come to mean "virtually" or "figuratively"but from a natural tendency to use the word as a general intensive, as in They had literally no help from the government on the project, where no contrast with the figurative sense of the words is intended.
itself

The
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published
by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ThesaurusLegend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Adv. 1. literally – in a literal sense; "literally translated"; "he said so literally"

figuratively – in a figurative sense; "figuratively speaking,…"

2. literally – (intensifier before a figurative expression) without exaggeration; "our eyes were literally pinned to TV during the Gulf War"

intensifier, intensive
– a modifier that has little meaning except to intensify the meaning it
modifies; "`up’ in `finished up’ is an intensifier"; "`honestly’ in `I
honestly don’t know’ is an intensifier"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2008 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

metephorically speaking

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met·a·phor http://img.tfd.com/m/sound.swf (mt-fôr, -fr)

n.

1.
A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates
one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit
comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world’s a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood
has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass,
the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven"
(Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher-1 in Indo-European roots.]

meta·phoric (-fôrk, -fr-), meta·phori·cal adj.
meta·phori·cal·ly adv.

The
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published
by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ThesaurusLegend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Adv. 1. metaphorically – in a metaphorical manner; "she expressed herself metaphorically"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2008 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

myspace

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CASA BEY

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noise pollution

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