Polaris Introduces Revolutionary New Off-Road Vehicle

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Motor Sports Newswire

Sportsman ACE is Confidence-Inspiring and Fun to Ride

MINNEAPOLIS, MN – January 23, 2014 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Polaris® Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), the leading manufacturer of off-road vehicles, today announced the company is defining an entirely-new type of off-road vehicle with the introduction of the Sportsman® ACE. The vehicle’s architecture is completely new to the industry and features a revolutionary, sit-in chassis that is nimble and comfortable to operate. The design of the new Sportsman ACE provides a confidence-inspired ride, all while being trail-capable, offering an all-new off-road experience.

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“The introduction of the Sportsman ACE is part of our strategy to remain the leader in the powersports marketplace by introducing innovative products that define their categories,” said David Longren, vice president of Polaris’ Off-Road Division. “In creating the Sportsman ACE, we wanted to not only appeal to current off-road enthusiasts, but develop a vehicle that…

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“God Is Dead?”

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Black Sabbath

Grit, Grime and Graffiti: Christopher Morris on the New York Subway, 1981

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WHAT YOU WRITE .COM

New York was a very different place in the 1980s. Throughout America, and the world, it had a reputation for being a crime-riddled, dirty metropolis – one much changed from its bustling, mid-twentieth century prime. And nowhere was this more evident than on the city’s subway trains and platforms. Once the pride of Manhattan and the boroughs, the network had become a virtual no-go area both at night and during the day. Indeed, even a cursory glance at crime statistics shows us that in 1985 there were approximately 14,000 underground felonies – a far cry from today’s approximate 2,000.

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But to a then 22-year-old Florida photographer named Christopher Morris, who was interning at New York photo agency Black Star, and who was eager to make his mark like photographers he admired working in Beirut and El Salvador, this graffiti battleground proved an opportunity to work on something of a domestic…

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US House of Representatives

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United States House of Representatives

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the United States Congress (a bicameral legislature). It is frequently referred to as the House. The other house is the Senate.

The composition and powers of the House are established in Article One of the United States Constitution. The major power of the House is to pass federal legislation that affects the entire country, although its bills must also be passed by the Senate and further agreed to by the U.S. President before becoming law (unless both the House and Senate re-pass the legislation with a two-thirds majority in each chamber). The House has some exclusive powers: the power to initiate revenue bills,[1] to impeach officials (impeached officials are subsequently tried in the Senate),[2] and to elect the U.S. President in case there is no majority in the Electoral College.[3]

Each U.S. state is represented in the House in proportion to its population as measured in the census, but every state is entitled to at least one representative. The most populous state, California, currently has 53 representatives. On the other end of the spectrum, there are seven states with only one representative each (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming). The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435.[4] Each representative serves for a two-year term. The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, who presides over the chamber, is elected by the members of the House, and is therefore traditionally the leader of the House Democratic Caucus or the House Republican Conference, whichever party has more voting members. The House meets in the south wing of the United States Capitol

US Senate

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United States Senate

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United States Senate is a legislative chamber in the bicameral legislature of the United States of America, and together with the U.S. House of Representatives makes up the U.S. Congress. First convened in 1789, the composition and powers of the Senate are established in Article One of the U.S. Constitution.[1] Each U.S. state is represented by two senators, regardless of population, who serve staggered six-year terms. The chamber of the United States Senate is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C., the national capital. The House of Representatives convenes in the south wing of the same building.

The Senate has several exclusive powers not granted to the House, including consenting to treaties as a precondition to their ratification and consenting to or confirming appointments of Cabinet secretaries, federal judges, other federal executive officials, military officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, and other federal uniformed officers,[2][3] as well as trial of federal officials impeached by the House. The Senate is both a more deliberative[4] and more prestigious[5][6][7] body than the House of Representatives, due to its longer terms, smaller size, and statewide constituencies, which historically led to a more collegial and less partisan atmosphere.[8]

US Congress

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United States Congress

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States consisting of two houses:

the House of Representatives and the Senate. Congress meets in the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Both representatives and senators are chosen through direct election. Members are affiliated to the Republican Party or to the Democratic Party, and only rarely to a third-party or as independents. Congress has 535 voting members: 435 Representatives and 100 Senators.

The members of the House of Representatives serve two-year terms representing the people of a district. Congressional districts are apportioned to states by population using the United States Census results, provided that each state has at least one congressperson. Each state regardless of population has exactly two senators; at present there are 100 senators representing the 50 states. Each senator serves a six-year term, with terms staggered, so every two years approximately one-third of the Senate is up for election. Each staggered group of one-third of the senators are called ‘classes‘. No state of the United States has two senators from the same class.

Watch “Wu-Tang Clan – Protect Ya Neck” on YouTube

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